World War I

Chut, J’ecoute: The U.S. Army’s Use of Radio Intelligence in World War I

Written By: Betsy Rohaly Smoot  “This source of information, practically unthought-of before the war, has been developed to such an extent that, at the close of hostilities, it constituted one of the main branches of intelligence.”  Captain Charles H. Matz, Radio Intelligence Officer, First Army, American Expeditionary Forces, November 1918 The United States entered World …

Chut, J’ecoute: The U.S. Army’s Use of Radio Intelligence in World War I Read More »

Artwork of Samuel Johnson Woolf

Written By: Katie Holt An artist well known for his portraits of twentieth-century influential figures, Samuel Johnson Woolf spent four months in France during World War I with the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF).  As an artist-correspondent for Collier’s Weekly, Woolf was embedded in the trenches along the front and behind the lines.  Immediately upon returning …

Artwork of Samuel Johnson Woolf Read More »

The Dawn of American Armor: The U.S. Army Tank Corps in World War I

Written By: Eric Anderson For better or for worse, war often drives innovation.  World War I, in particular, heralded the introduction of numerous formidable and terrifying technologies:  flamethrowers, poison gas, combat aircraft, and tanks, to name a few.  While the idea of an armored vehicle equipped with cannon can be traced as far back as Leonardo …

The Dawn of American Armor: The U.S. Army Tank Corps in World War I Read More »

Chut, J’ecoute: The U.S. Army’s Use of Radio Intelligence in World War I

By Betsy Rohaly Smoot “This source of information, practically unthought-of before the war, has been developed to such an extent that, at the close of hostilities, it constituted one of the main branches of intelligence.” Captain Charles H. Matz, Radio Intelligence Officer, First Army, American Expeditionary Forces, November 1918. The United States entered World War …

Chut, J’ecoute: The U.S. Army’s Use of Radio Intelligence in World War I Read More »

Borrowed Soldiers:  The American 27th and 30th Divisions and the British Army on the Ypres Front, August-September 1918

Written By: Mitchell Yockelson Ypres, or “Wipers,” as the British Tommies called the ancient Belgian city, is synonymous with World War I.  An extraordinary number of lives were lost there and in the nearby salient during seemingly endless fighting over the course of four years.  Numerous monuments and cemeteries dot the landscape and remind one …

Borrowed Soldiers:  The American 27th and 30th Divisions and the British Army on the Ypres Front, August-September 1918 Read More »

“… the war will be over and then we can be together always”: World War I Letters Home from an Army Lawyer in France

By Fred L. Borch and Jennifer L. Crawford From the early days of the U.S. Army, soldiers at war have relished contact with their families and friends at home.  From the Civil War through Vietnam, it was letters and postcards; today it is email and Skype.  Not only has the desire to stay in contact …

“… the war will be over and then we can be together always”: World War I Letters Home from an Army Lawyer in France Read More »

41st Infantry Division, ARNG

During World War II, American troops in the Pacific Theater experienced some of the toughest combat in U.S. military history. Whether in the steamy jungles of New Guinea, Guadalcanal, or the Philippines, or on the various sun scorched atolls of the Pacific, American soldiers faced a tough adversary in the troops of the Japanese Imperial …

41st Infantry Division, ARNG Read More »

12th Engineers (Light Railway)

Shortly after the United States entered World War I, British and French commissions arrived in Washington and stated that their most immediate need was for engineer units to build and maintain railway lines supplying the Western Front. The War Department quickly responded to the Anglo-French request, and in May 1917 it directed that nine railway engineer …

12th Engineers (Light Railway) Read More »