Army History Center

Local CEO, Vietnam Veteran, pledges $1 Million to Museum Campaign

Bob Stanford, CEO of Zenith Aviation in Fredericksburg, Va. has pledged $1 million to support the National Museum of the United States Army.  This most recent gift adds to the over $177 million raised thus far by the National Army Museum Capital Campaign.   Stanford, a pilot and Vietnam veteran, presented his check to Lieutenant General …

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Museum Spotlight: The Global War Gallery

The Global War Gallery will tell the story of the Army’s operations around the globe during World War II.  Occupying 6,500 square feet, it will be the largest within the Fighting for the Nation Galleries.  The gallery’s main focus begins in 1941, running through the end of the war, and explores how over eight million …

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Kazuo Yamane

By Matthew J. Seelinger During World War II, thousands of Japanese-American soldiers proudly served in the U.S. Army. These men, known as Nisei (second generation Japanese born in the United States), did so despite the internment of many Japanese-Americans due to their ethnic background. Once given the opportunity to serve, many men enthusiastically volunteered for …

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The Battle of Newtown, August 29, 1779: An Aggressive Attack Carried Out With Audacity

Written By: MAJ Glenn T. Williams, AUS-Ret. In 1778 the Continental Congress authorized funds and instructed General George Washington to send an expedition of the Continental Army into Iroquois country to “chastise,” or punish, “those of the Six Nations that were hostile to the United Stated.”  For more than two years, four of the Iroquois …

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The 291st Engineer Combat Battalion

Written By: David Lemelin  It was almost sundown near the village of Neucy, Belgium.  A thick fog had settled over the ground, worsening the already poor twilight visibility.  SS Lieutenant Colonel Joachim Peiper squinted down the road, past the lead tanks of his panzer column and towards the Neufmoulin Bridge, a small wooden structure barely …

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Chut, J’ecoute: The U.S. Army’s Use of Radio Intelligence in World War I

Written By: Betsy Rohaly Smoot  “This source of information, practically unthought-of before the war, has been developed to such an extent that, at the close of hostilities, it constituted one of the main branches of intelligence.”  Captain Charles H. Matz, Radio Intelligence Officer, First Army, American Expeditionary Forces, November 1918 The United States entered World …

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Artwork of Samuel Johnson Woolf

Written By: Katie Holt An artist well known for his portraits of twentieth-century influential figures, Samuel Johnson Woolf spent four months in France during World War I with the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF).  As an artist-correspondent for Collier’s Weekly, Woolf was embedded in the trenches along the front and behind the lines.  Immediately upon returning …

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