Feature

The Battle of Newtown, August 29, 1779: An Aggressive Attack Carried Out With Audacity

Written By: MAJ Glenn T. Williams, AUS-Ret. In 1778 the Continental Congress authorized funds and instructed General George Washington to send an expedition of the Continental Army into Iroquois country to “chastise,” or punish, “those of the Six Nations that were hostile to the United Stated.”  For more than two years, four of the Iroquois …

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Chut, J’ecoute: The U.S. Army’s Use of Radio Intelligence in World War I

Written By: Betsy Rohaly Smoot  “This source of information, practically unthought-of before the war, has been developed to such an extent that, at the close of hostilities, it constituted one of the main branches of intelligence.”  Captain Charles H. Matz, Radio Intelligence Officer, First Army, American Expeditionary Forces, November 1918 The United States entered World …

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From a Teenager in China to an Army Lawyer in America: The Remarkable Career of Judge Advocate General John L. Fugh

Written By: Fred L. Borch While many soldiers can claim to have “remarkable” careers, few match the achievements in uniform of John Liu Fugh.  Born in Beijing, China, in 1934, Fugh came to the United States as a teenager in 1949.  After graduating from law school, he joined the Army in 1960.  For the next …

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What Really Happened on 16 March 1968? What Lessons Have Been Learned? A Look at the My Lai Incident Fifty Years Later

Written By: Fred L. Borch On 16 March 1968—fifty years ago—First Lieutenant William L. “Rusty” Calley, Jr., and his platoon murdered at least 300 Vietnamese civilians (and perhaps as many as 500) at a small South Vietnamese sub-hamlet called My Lai. This article examines what really happened in the “My Lai Incident,” or the “My …

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Three Days in March: El Paso, the U.S. Army, and the Escobar Revolution of 1929

Written By: G. Alan Knight Once again, El Paso, Texas, found itself dragged into the chaotic world of Mexican political and military strife for three tension-filled days in March 1929.  While fatalities were few and property damage light, the potential for conflict with Mexico was a very real possibility.  The situation in neighboring Ciudad Juarez …

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Lieutenant Charles B. Gatewood: Premier Cavalry Soldier of the American West

 Written By: Lieutenant Colonel Paul Fardink, USA-Ret. History affords the unique perspective of offering clarity through retrospection. Even though Lieutenant Charles B. Gatewood, using mutual respect and negotiation—not bullets and bravado—potentially saved the lives of countless cavalrymen, settlers, Native Americans, and Mexicans by ensuring Geronimo’s surrender in 1886 after years of contentious and bloody Indian …

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Soldiers on the Moon?!? The Army’s Strange but True Plan for a Lunar Outpost

Written by: Fred L. Borch “ … a lunar outpost … is of critical importance to the U.S. Army of the future.” It was March 1959, and Lieutenant General Arthur G. Trudeau, the writer of those words, was tasking Major General John H. Hinrichs, the Army’s Chief of Ordnance, to develop a proposal for a …

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133d Engineer Combat Battalion and One Soldier’s Sketches of Its Operations

Written by: James Stejskal In mid-January 1945, with the darkness of night enveloping them, bridge specialists from all three companies of the 133d Engineer Combat Battalion quietly slipped down the southern embankment of the Sauer River. They were preparing to deliver soldiers from the 5th Infantry Division across the river in rubber assault boats. They …

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The Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps: A Hundred Years Old and Still Going Strong

Written By Colonel Woolf Gross, USA-Ret. In 2016, the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) celebrated its centennial as the largest producer of commissioned officers for the U.S. Army. In its first century, Army ROTC has turned out over a million “shavetails” for the force. How it came into being is an interesting story involving …

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