World War II

The 505th Infantry Regiment

Written By: Nicholas C. Welsh Throughout its long and storied history, the 505th Infantry Regiment has maintained a proud legacy within the U.S. Army and upheld the fighting spirit established by its first commander, James Gavin.  Today, as it was then, the 505th Infantry represents an elite force of soldiers dedicated to fighting tyranny and …

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No Greater Glory: The Four Chaplains and the Sinking of the USAT Dorchester

Written By: Command Sergeant Major James H. Clifford, USA-Ret. In the early morning hours of 3 February 1943, First Sergeant Michael Warish nearly gave up hope as he floated helplessly in the freezing waters of the North Atlantic.  Just minutes earlier, he and the almost 900 others aboard the USAT Dorchester were near safe waters when …

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Railroaders in Olive Drab: The Military Railway Service in WWII

In July 1861, Confederate Brigadier General Joseph E. Johnston dramatically demonstrated the importance of railroads in modern warfare when he moved 12,000 troops by rail from Piedmont Station (now Delaplane), Virginia, to Manassas Junction, a distance of about fifty miles, to reinforce the Confederate forces assembled southwest of Washington, DC.  The move took only about …

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Rudder’s Rangers and the Boys of Pointe du Hoc: The U.S. Army Rangers’ Mission in the Early Morning Hours of 6 June 1944

Written By: Megan Johnson  Pointe du Hoc, a prominent position along the coast of Normandy, was a focal point of the amphibious assault by U.S. forces during the early morning hours of D-Day, 6 June 1944.  The cliff top (sometimes referred to as Pointe du Hoe) is located between Utah and Omaha Beaches and sits …

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The Persian Gulf Command and the Lend-Lease Mission to the Soviet Union during World War II

By Lieutenant Colonel Danny M. Johnson, AUS-Ret. When the subject of the the U.S. Army and the Persian Gulf comes up, the first thing today’s Americans often think of is 1990-91, when American and coalition forces deployed to Saudi Arabia as part of Operation DESERT SHIELD/DESERT STORM to drive the Iraqi Army out of Kuwait, …

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“Skirted Soldiers”:  The Women’s Army Corps and Gender Integration of the U.S. Army during World War II

By Melissa Ziobro Prior to World War II, the Army occasionally used women in “gender appropriate” roles.  For example, civilian women, often known as camp followers, cooked and performed other chores for soldiers during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, much as they had done for their men in times of peace.  A few women acted …

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The Other Foe: The U.S. Army’s Fight against Malaria in the Pacific Theater, 1942-45

Written By: Seth Paltzer Disease has always had a major impact on armies at war, often producing more casualties than combat wounds.  The history of the U.S. Army is full of examples of this fact.  The Civil War Trust estimates that for every three men killed in combat from 1861 to 1865, another five died …

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To the Last Man: The 103d Regimental Combat Team in the Pacific, 1942-1945

Written by: First Lieutenant Jonathan D. Bratten, Joint Force Headquarters Command Historian, Maine Army National Guard It was September 1941 when Sergeant Leroy Adams of the 152d Field Artillery Regiment pushed his section of 75mm guns up to knock out six enemy tanks that were threatening a nearby infantry company.  It was his first time bringing artillery …

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Sergeant George F. Noland and the Battle of Attu Island, 1943

By Ephriam D. Dickson III Deputy Chief, Field Museums Branch, U.S. Army Center of Military History Six months after their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese military expanded its control into the north Pacific. In June 1942, they launched an air raid against the U.S. naval base at Dutch Harbor, Alaska, and then landed …

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