Feature

The Dawn of American Armor: The U.S. Army Tank Corps in World War I

Written By: Eric Anderson For better or for worse, war often drives innovation.  World War I, in particular, heralded the introduction of numerous formidable and terrifying technologies:  flamethrowers, poison gas, combat aircraft, and tanks, to name a few.  While the idea of an armored vehicle equipped with cannon can be traced as far back as Leonardo …

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“I will give them one more shot!” Battery A, 4th U.S. Artillery, at the Battle of Gettysburg, 2-3 July 1863

Written By Donald McConnell and Gustav Person When the Civil War erupted in April 1861, the twelve batteries of the 4th U.S. Artillery were spread out across the continental United States.  The regimental headquarters was simply an administrative body, without any tactical responsibilities.  With the exception of two batteries (D and L) stationed at the …

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“Our Officers and Men Behaved Like Men Determined To Be Free”: The Battle of Stony Point, 15-16 July 1779

Written By Eric Anderson Historian Henry P. Johnston writes that the Battle of Stony Point was “…altogether the most brilliant performance of the [American] revolution.”  Yet in most books about the conflict, the battle is only mentioned in passing, if mentioned at all, its importance overshadowed by larger actions such as Saratoga, Monmouth, and Yorktown.  Indeed, …

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Mobility, Vigilance, Justice: The U.S. Constabulary Forces in Germany, 1946-1952

Written By David A. Kaufman Following the surrender of Nazi Germany on 8 May 1945, the U.S. Army was faced with several complex tasks regarding its personnel In Europe.  First, and most important, was the discharge of veterans with sufficient points as a result of overseas service, decorations earned from combat, dependents, and other criteria.  …

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Chut, J’ecoute: The U.S. Army’s Use of Radio Intelligence in World War I

By Betsy Rohaly Smoot “This source of information, practically unthought-of before the war, has been developed to such an extent that, at the close of hostilities, it constituted one of the main branches of intelligence.” Captain Charles H. Matz, Radio Intelligence Officer, First Army, American Expeditionary Forces, November 1918. The United States entered World War …

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A Forty-Minute Korean War: The Soviet Defector Firefight in the Joint Security Area, Panmunjom, Korea, 23 November 1984

Written By: Colonel Thomas Hanson, USA-Ret. Vasilii Yakovlevich Matuzok had dreamed of fleeing the oppression of communism since his high school days in Moscow.  At age twenty-two, he became a translator in the Soviet embassy in Pyongyang, capital city of dictator Kim Il-sung’s Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.  Almost as soon as Matuzok arrived in …

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U.S. and German Field Artillery in World War II: A Comparison

Written By: William G. Dennis At first glance, there seems to be little difference between the artillery branches of the U.S. Army and German Wehrmacht in World War II.  The American guns were a bit heavier than their German counterparts and generally had a longer range.  The German 105mm was sufficiently similar to the American …

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No Greater Glory: The Four Chaplains and the Sinking of the USAT Dorchester

Written By: Command Sergeant Major James H. Clifford, USA-Ret. In the early morning hours of 3 February 1943, First Sergeant Michael Warish nearly gave up hope as he floated helplessly in the freezing waters of the North Atlantic.  Just minutes earlier, he and the almost 900 others aboard the USAT Dorchester were near safe waters when …

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Railroaders in Olive Drab: The Military Railway Service in WWII

In July 1861, Confederate Brigadier General Joseph E. Johnston dramatically demonstrated the importance of railroads in modern warfare when he moved 12,000 troops by rail from Piedmont Station (now Delaplane), Virginia, to Manassas Junction, a distance of about fifty miles, to reinforce the Confederate forces assembled southwest of Washington, DC.  The move took only about …

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